Éditoriaux Défense Sécurité Terrorisme Zones de conflits Logistique Livres de référence Liens
Terre Air Mer Gendarmerie Renseignement Infoguerre Cyber Recherche

The Electronic Frontier: The Challenge of Unlawful Conduct Involving the Use Of The Internet

The Electronic Frontier: The Challenge of Unlawful Conduct Involving the Use Of The Internet

A Report of the President’s Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet, March 2000.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

I. Introduction

  • Executive Order 13,133 2
  • The Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet
  • Summary of Strategy

II. Policy Framework and Legal Analysis

A. Understanding the Nature of Unlawful Conduct Involving

  • Computers
  • Computers as Targets
  • Computers as Storage Devices
  • Computers as Communications Tools

B. A Framework for Evaluating Unlawful Conduct on the Internet

  • Online-Offline Consistency
  • Appropriate Investigatory Tools
  • Technology-Neutrality
  • Consideration of Other Societal Interests

C. Promoting Private Sector Leadership

D. Sufficiency of Existing Federal Laws

  • Analysis of Substantive Laws
  • New Investigatory Challenges

III. Law Enforcement Needs and Challenges

A. Protecting Computers and Networks

B. Federal Tools and Capabilities

  • Personnel, Equipment, and Training
  • Locating and Identifying Cybercriminals
  • Collecting Evidence

C. State and Local Tools and Capabilities

  • Jurisdiction
  • Interstate and Federal-State Cooperation
  • Resources

D. Legal Authorities: Gaps in Domestic Laws

  • Pen Register and Trap and Trace Statute
  • Computer Fraud and Abuse Act
  • Privacy Protection Act
  • Electronic Communications Privacy Act
  • Telephone Harassment

6. Cable Communications Policy Act

E. Challenges for International Cooperation

  • Substantive International Criminal Law
  • Multilateral Efforts
  • Continuing Need for International Cooperation

IV. The Role of Public Education and Empowerment

Educating and Empowering Parents, Teachers, and Children

  • Technological Tools
  • Non-technological Tools

B. Educating and Empowering Consumers

FTC Initiatives: Using Technology to Educate Consumers

  • Department of Commerce Initiatives
  • FDA’s Outreach Campaign
  • SEC’s Investor Education Efforts
  • CPSC’s Consumer Outreach Efforts

C. Developing Cybercitizens

V. Conclusions and Recommendations

Appendices

A Executive Order 13,133

B Internet Fraud

C Online Child Pornography

D Internet Sale of Prescription Drugs and Controlled Substances

E Internet Sale of Firearms

F Internet Gambling

G Internet Sale of Alcohol

H Online Security Fraud

I Software Piracy and Intellectual Property Theft

J Multilateral Efforts

THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER: THE CHALLENGE OF UNLAWFUL CONDUCT INVOLVING THE USE OF THE INTERNET

A Report of the President’s Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet

- March 2000 -

Executive Summary

It should come as no surprise that the Internet is rapidly transforming the way we communicate, educate, and buy and sell goods and services. As the Internet’s potential to provide unparalleled benefits to society continues to expand, however, its potential to serve as a powerful new medium for those who wish to commit unlawful acts has also grown.

Unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet is just as intolerable as any other type of illegal activity. Ensuring the safety and security of those who use the Internet is thus a critical element of the Administration’s overall policy regarding the Internet and electronic commerce, a policy that seeks to promote private sector leadership, technology-neutral laws and regulation, and an appreciation of the Internet as an important medium for commerce and communication both domestically and internationally. Indeed, the continued growth and maturation of this new medium depends on our taking a balanced approach that ensures that the Internet does not become a haven for unlawful activity.

"Unlawful is not unique to the Internet - but the Internet has a way of magnifying both the good and the bad in our society...[W]hat we need to do is find new answers to old crimes."

Vice President Al Gore August 5, 1999

For these reasons, the President and Vice President established an interagency Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet, chaired by the Attorney General, to provide an initial analysis of legal and policy issues surrounding the use of the Internet to commit unlawful acts. Specifically, the Working Group considered

  1. the extent to which existing federal laws are sufficient to address unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet;
  2. the extent to which new tools, capabilities, or legal authorities may be needed for effective investigation and prosecution of such conduct; and
  3. the potential for using education and empowerment tools to minimize the risks from such conduct.

Consistent with the Administration’s overall policy, the Working Group recommends a 3-part approach for addressing unlawful conduct on the Internet:

First, any regulation of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet should be analyzed through a policy framework that ensures that online conduct is treated in a manner consistent with the way offline conduct is treated, in a technology-neutral manner, and in a manner that takes account of other important societal interests, such as privacy and protection of civil liberties;

Second, law enforcement needs and challenges posed by the Internet should be recognized as significant, particularly in the areas of resources, training, and the need for new investigative tools and capabilities, coordination with and among federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, and coordination with and among our international counterparts; and

Third, there should be continued support for private sector leadership and the development of methods – such as "cyberethics" curricula, appropriate technological tools, and media and other outreach efforts – that educate and empower Internet users to prevent and minimize the risks of unlawful activity.

Prior technological advances – the automobile, the telegraph, and the telephone, for example – have brought dramatic improvements for society, but have also created new opportunities for wrongdoing. The same is true of the Internet, which provides unparalleled opportunities for socially beneficial endeavors – such as education, research, commerce, entertainment, and discourse on public affairs – in ways that we may not now even be able to imagine. By the same token, however, individuals who wish to use a computer as a tool to facilitate unlawful activity may find that the Internet provides a vast, inexpensive, and potentially anonymous way to commit unlawful acts, such as fraud, the sale or distribution of child pornography, the sale of guns or drugs or other regulated substances without regulatory protections, and the unlawful distribution of computer software or other creative material protected by intellectual property rights.

"While the Internet and other information technologies are bringing enormous benefits to society, they also provide new opportunities for criminal behavior."

Attorney General Janet Reno, January 10, 2000

In its analysis of existing federal laws in these and other areas, the Working Group finds that existing substantive federal laws generally do not distinguish between unlawful conduct committed through the use of the Internet and the same conduct committed through the use of other, more traditional means of communication. For example, laws governing fraud – such as credit card fraud, identity theft, securities fraud, gambling, and unfair and deceptive trade acts or practices – apply with equal force to both online as well as offline conduct. To the extent these existing laws adequately address unlawful conduct in the offline world, they should, for the most part, adequately cover unlawful conduct on the Internet. There may be a few instances, however, where relevant federal laws need to be amended to better reflect the realities of new technologies, such as the Internet.

Despite the general adequacy of laws that define the substance of criminal and other offenses, the Working Group finds that the Internet presents new and significant investigatory challenges for law enforcement at all levels. These challenges include: the need for real-time tracing of Internet communications across traditional jurisdictional boundaries, both domestically and internationally; the need to track down sophisticated users who commit unlawful acts on the Internet while hiding their identities; the need for hand-in-glove coordination among various law enforcement agencies; and the need for trained and well-equipped personnel – at federal, state, local, and global levels – to gather evidence, investigate, and prosecute these cases. In some instances, federal procedural and evidentiary laws may need to be amended to better enable law enforcement to meet these challenges.

These needs and challenges are neither trivial nor theoretical. Law enforcement agencies today, for example, are faced with the need to evaluate and to determine the source, typically on very short notice, of anonymous e-mails that contain bomb threats against a given building or threats to cause serious bodily injury. Other scenarios raise similarly significant concerns: If a hacker uses the Internet to weave communications through computers in six different countries to break into an online business’ records of customer credit card information, consumer confidence in the security of e-commerce and the Internet may be damaged if law enforcement agencies are unable to cooperate and coordinate rapidly with their counterparts in the other countries to find the perpetrator.

Finally, an essential component of the Working Group’s strategy is continued support for private sector leadership and the development of methods – such as "cyberethics" curricula, appropriate technological tools, and media and other outreach efforts – that educate and empower Internet users so as to minimize the risks of unlawful activity. This Administration has already initiated numerous efforts to educate consumers, parents, teachers, and children about ways to ensure safe and enjoyable Internet experiences, and those efforts should continue. The private sector has also undertaken substantial self-regulatory efforts – such as voluntary codes of conduct and appropriate cooperation with law enforcement – that show responsible leadership in preventing and minimizing the risks of unlawful conduct on the Internet. Those efforts must also continue to grow. Working together, we can ensure that the Internet and its benefits will continue to grow and flourish in the years and decades to come.

THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER: THE CHALLENGE OF UNLAWFUL CONDUCT INVOLVING THE USE OF THE INTERNET

A Report of the President’s Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet, March 2000

On April 7, 1999, visitors to an online financial news message board operated by Yahoo!, Inc. got a scoop on PairGain, a telecommunications company based in Tustin, California. An e-mail posted on the message board under the subject line "Buyout News" said that PairGain was being taken over by an Israeli company. The e-mail also provided a link to what appeared to be a website of Bloomberg News Service, containing a detailed story on the takeover. As news of the takeover spread, the company’s publicly traded stock shot up more than 30 percent, and the trading volume grew to nearly seven times its norm. There was only one problem: the story was false, and the website on which it appeared was not Bloomberg’s site, but a counterfeit site. When news of the hoax spread, the price of the stock dropped sharply, causing significant financial losses to many investors who purchased the stock at artificially inflated prices.

Within a week after this hoax appeared, the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a Raleigh, North Carolina man for what was believed to be the first stock manipulation scheme perpetrated by a fraudulent Internet site. The perpetrator was traced through an Internet Protocol address that he used, and he was charged with securities fraud for disseminating false information about a publicly traded stock. The Securities and Exchange Commission also brought a parallel civil enforcement action against him. In August, he was sentenced to five years of probation, five months of home detention, and over $93,000 in restitution to the victims of his fraud.

I. INTRODUCTION

The use of new technology to commit traditional crimes, such as securities fraud, is not new. Advances in technology – the advent of the automobile and the telephone, for instance – have always given wrongdoers new means for engaging in unlawful conduct. The Internet is no different: it is simply a new medium through which traditional crimes can now be committed, albeit through the use of inexpensive and widely available computer and telecommunications systems, and with unprecedented speed and on a far-reaching scale. At the same time, as exemplified by the PairGain case, the tools and capabilities associated with new technologies can in many instances help law enforcement agencies solve such crimes.

How should society, and government in particular, respond to the advent of these new ways of committing traditional crimes? This report responds to a recent Executive Order from the President and sketches the preliminary contours of a legal and policy answer to that question. It provides a foundation and offers a framework for further dialogue among law enforcement officials and policymakers at all levels; members of the business community, trade associations, and the non-profit sector; and members of the public on one of the most important issues we face in response to this powerful new communications medium and our new digital economy.

A. Executive Order 13,133

In August 1999, President Clinton established an interagency Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet ("Working Group"). Executive Order 13,133 directed the Working Group, under the leadership of the Attorney General, to address the issue of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet and to prepare a report with recommendations on:

• The extent to which existing federal laws provide a sufficient basis for effective investigation and prosecution of unlawful conduct that involves the use of the Internet, such as the illegal sale of guns, explosives, controlled substances, and prescription drugs, as well as fraud and child pornography;

• The extent to which new technology tools, capabilities, or legal authorities may be required for effective investigation and prosecution of unlawful conduct that involves the use of the Internet; and

• The potential for new or existing tools and capabilities to educate and empower parents, teachers, and others to prevent or to minimize the risks from unlawful conduct that involves the use of the Internet.

The Executive Order further directed the Working Group to conduct its review in the context of current Administration policy concerning the Internet. That policy includes support for industry self-regulation where possible, support for technology-neutral laws and regulations, and an appreciation of the Internet as an important medium for commerce and free speech both domestically and internationally.1 The full text of the Executive Order appears in Appendix A to this report.

This report responds to the directive of Executive Order 13,133 and sets forth a strategy for responding to unlawful conduct on the Internet and for ensuring a safe and secure online environment. As discussed in greater detail below, the Working Group’s proposed strategy consists of a 3-part approach that includes: (a) a framework of policy principles for evaluating the need for Internet-specific laws to prohibit unlawful conduct; (b) recognition of the new and significant investigatory needs and challenges posed by the Internet; and (c) support for private sector leadership and the development of appropriate technological tools and outreach efforts to educate and empower Internet users to prevent and minimize the risks of unlawful acts facilitated by the Internet.

Part II of this report focuses on the first component of the strategy, describing the nature of unlawful activity on the Internet and proposing a framework for analyzing policy and legal responses to such activity. Part II also discusses efforts to promote private-sector leadership in this area and summarizes the Working Group’s analysis of the adequacy of existing substantive federal laws, as applied to unlawful conduct on the Internet. Part III of the report then identifies several areas in which new technology tools, capabilities, or legal authorities may be required for effective evidence-gathering, investigation, and prosecution of unlawful conduct that involves the use of the Internet. Part IV of the report focuses on the third component of the strategy, urging support for expanded educational efforts and technological tools to empower Internet users. Finally, Part V summarizes the report’s conclusions and recommendations for further action.

B. The Working Group on Unlawful Conduct on the Internet

Pursuant to Executive Order 13,133, the Working Group included the Attorney General, who served as chair of the Working Group; the Director of the Office of Management and Budget; the Secretary of the Treasury; the Secretary of Commerce; the Secretary of Education; the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms; the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration; the Chair of the Federal Trade Commission; and the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. In addition, given their interest and expertise in the subject matter, representatives from the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the U.S. Customs Service, the Department of Defense, the Department of State, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, the Postal Inspection Service, the U.S. Secret Service, and the Securities and Exchange Commission also participated on the Working Group.

In preparing this report, the Working Group benefited from the views of representatives of a variety of entities outside the federal government, including, for example:

• State and local groups, such as the National Association of Attorneys General; the National District Attorneys Association; the National Association of Boards of Pharmacies; and the National League of Cities;

• Industry groups, such as the Internet Alliance, the Computer Systems Policy Project, the Business Software Alliance, and representatives of Internet service providers and other high-technology companies; and

• Non-profit advocacy and civil liberties groups, such as the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

We look forward to continuing our dialogue with these and other groups on the important and substantial issues raised in this report.

C. Summary of Strategy

The Internet already is and will continue to be a major force for communication and economic growth in the decades ahead. Consistent with its 1997 Framework for Global Economic Commerce, the Administration is continuing to work toward providing a market-oriented policy environment to support the development of this new digital economy. In developing such an environment, it is essential to address some of the possible negative side effects associated with this new economy. These goals are not inconsistent; rather, they are mutually reinforcing: continued growth in economic commerce will require a stable, predictable legal environment that includes vigorous enforcement of consumer protections; and focused law enforcement efforts in turn will promote greater consumer confidence and trust in the Internet as a safe and secure medium of communications and commerce.

To further these goals, the Working Group recommends a 3-part approach for addressing unlawful conduct on the Internet:

• First, evaluating the need for Internet-specific regulation of unlawful conduct through a framework of general policy principles, including the principle that online and offline conduct should be treated consistently and in a technology-neutral way;

• Second, recognizing the significant law enforcement needs and challenges posed by the Internet, particularly in the areas of resources, training, and the need for new investigatory tools and capabilities, coordination with and among federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, and coordination with and among our international counterparts; and

• Third, supporting continued private sector leadership and the development of methods – such as "cyberethics" curricula, appropriate technological tools, and media and other outreach efforts – that educate and empower Internet users so as to prevent and minimize the risks of unlawful activity.

Each of these components is an integral part of our overall proposed strategy and is discussed in greater detail in the report that follows.

II. POLICY FRAMEWORK AND LEGAL ANALYSIS

There can be little doubt that the Internet – a global electronic network of computer networks (including the World Wide Web) that connects people and information2 – has revolutionized and will continue to revolutionize how we communicate, educate ourselves, and buy and sell goods and services. The Internet has grown from 65 million users in 1998 to over 100 million users in the U.S. in 1999, or half the country’s adult population; the number of Internet users in the U.S. is projected to reach 177 million by the end of 2003; and the number of Internet users worldwide is estimated to reach 502 million by 2003.3 Business-to-business electronic commerce totaled over $100 billion in 1999 (more than doubling from 1998) and is expected to grow to over $1 trillion by 2003.4

There can also be little doubt that the Internet provides immeasurable opportunities for far-reaching social benefits. Communications over the Internet, for example, permits unparalleled opportunities for education, research, commerce, entertainment, and discourse on public affairs. Electronic mail ("e-mail") has become an entirely new medium for business and personal communications, allowing users a fast and inexpensive way to keep in touch, to send text, pictures, or sound files to individuals or to groups, and to buy and sell goods and services. News and other information can be made available to anyone with a computer and a modem virtually instantaneously, and more information (on an absolute scale) can be made available to more people, due to the open and decentralized nature of the Internet (anyone can put up a website and "publish" information for the world to see). Access to research databases, directories, encyclopedias, and other information sources previously available only to those with the time, money, and energy to obtain physical access to print material has opened up a world of information to the average citizen. And by making transactions of all kinds cheaper, faster, interactive, and hence more efficient, electrnoic commerce ("e-commerce") is transforming the way businesses operate and the way consumers work, shop, and play.

The Internet, like most new technologies, is an inherently value-neutral tool: It can be used in ways that are socially beneficial or socially harmful. New technologies can, of course, create new forms of socially undesirable behavior. More often, they provide new ways of committing traditionally undesirable behavior. For example, the advent of the telephone allowed innovative lawbreakers not only to develop new crimes (e.g., long-distance toll fraud), but also to commit traditional crimes in a new manner (e.g., harassment through the use of the telephone).

The Internet has fared no better than other technologies against resourceful and technologically sophisticated individuals who seek to commit unlawful acts. Last year, for example, tens of thousands of computer users were struck by "Melissa" and "Explore.Zip.Worm," e-mail viruses that quickly spread around the world, erasing files, crashing systems, and costing companies millions of dollars in support and downtime. More recently, some of the most popular consumer and commercial websites were temporarily disabled as a result of "distributed denial-of-service" attacks. Other websites have been the targets of "page-jacking" schemes, in which websites and search engines are manipulated to drive unsuspecting users to unwanted (usually "adult") websites (see Appendix B for further discussion of page-jacking).

More generally, individuals who wish to use a computer as a tool to facilitate criminal activity may find the Internet as appealing, if not more so, as they did the telephone decades ago or the telegraph before that. Similar to the technologies that have preceded it, the Internet provides a new tool for wrongdoers to commit crimes, such as fraud, the sale or distribution of child pornography, the sale of guns or drugs or other regulated substances without regulatory protections, or the unlawful distribution of computer software or other creative material protected by intellectual property rights. In the most extreme circumstances, cyberstalking and other criminal conduct involving the Internet can lead to physical violence, abductions, and molestation. Although the precise extent of unlawful conduct involving the use of computers is unclear,5 the rapid growth of the Internet and e-commerce has made such unlawful conduct a critical priority for legislators, policymakers, industry, and law enforcement agencies.

A. Understanding the Nature of Unlawful Conduct Involving Computers

Although definitions of computer crime may differ, not every crime committed with a computer is a computer crime. For example, if someone steals a telephone access code and makes a long distance call, the code they have stolen is checked by a computer before the call is processed. Even so, such a case is more appropriately treated as "toll fraud," not computer crime. Although this example may seem straightforward, many cases cannot be so neatly categorized. For example, a bank teller who steals a $10 bill from a cash drawer is embezzling. A bank teller who writes a computer program to steal pennies from many accounts (at random) and to funnel that money into another bank through the electronic funds transfer system may also be embezzling, but both committing and prosecuting this offense may require a working knowledge of the bank’s computer system. Thus, such a crime may reasonably be characterized as a computer offense.

Broadly speaking, computers can play three distinct roles in a criminal case. First, a computer can be the target of an offense. This occurs when conduct is designed to take information without authorization from, or cause damage to, a computer or computer network. The "Melissa" and "Explore.Zip.Worm" viruses, along with "hacks" into the White House and other websites, are examples of this type of offense. Second, a computer can be incidental to an offense, but still significant for law enforcement purposes. For example, drug traffickers may store transactional data (such as names, dates, and amounts) on computers, rather than in paper form. Third, computers can be a tool for committing an offense, such as fraud or the unlawful sale of prescription drugs over te Internet. Each of these three roles can be and often are present in a single criminal case. Although this report focuses primarily on this third category of computer crime, it is important to understand the range of unlawful conduct that involves computers to appreciate the context of law enforcement needs and challenges relating to such conduct.

1. Computers as Targets

One obvious way in which a computer can be involved in unlawful conduct is when the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of a computer’s information or services is attacked. This form of crime targets a computer system, generally to acquire information stored on that computer system, to control the target system without authorization or payment (theft of service), or to alter the integrity of data or interfere with the availability of the computer or server. Many of these violations involve gaining unauthorized access to the target system (i.e., "hacking" into it).

Offenses involving theft of information may take a variety of forms, depending on the nature of the system attacked. Sensitive information stored on law enforcement and military computers offers a tempting target to many parties, including subjects of criminal investigations, terrorist organizations, and foreign intelligence operatives.

Hackers also target non-governmental systems to obtain proprietary or other valuable information. For example, a hacker might gain access to a hotel reservation system to steal credit card numbers. Other cases may fall into the broad category of intellectual property theft. This includes not only the theft of trade secrets, but also much more common offenses involving the unauthorized duplication of copyrighted materials, especially software programs. Other cases may involve a perpetrator who seeks private information about another individual, whether as a means to an end (e.g., to extort money or to embarrass the victim through public disclosure), to obtain a commercial advantage,6 or simply to satisfy personal curiosity. Targets in this category include systems containing medical records, telephone customer records (such as call records or unlisted directory information), or consumer credit report information.

Computers can also be the target of an offense in cases where an offender gains unauthorized access to a system. For instance, an offender may use his computer to break into a telephone switching system (including a private system, such as a PBX) to steal long-distance calling services. (This type of telephone equipment manipulation is often referred to as "phone phreaking" or simply "phreaking.") In some cases, hackers have used the resources of compromised systems to perform intensive computational tasks such as cracking encrypted passwords stolen from other sites. The theft-of-service offenses are often associated with the practice of "weaving," in which a hacker traverses multiple systems (and possibly multiple telecommunications networks, such as the Internet or cellular and landline telephone networks) to conceal his true identity and location. In this scenario, the sole reason for breaking into a given computer may be to use it as a stepping-stone for attacks on other systems.

A more insidious type of damage takes place in cases where the attacker compromises a system in furtherance of a larger scheme. The most well-known examples of this type of attack have involved telephone network computers. In one case, a hacker manipulated telephone switching equipment to guarantee that he would be the winning caller in several call-in contests held by local radio stations. The fruits of his scheme included two sports cars and $30,000 in cash. Internet-connected computers are subject to similar types of attacks. Routers – which are computers that direct data packets traveling on the Internet – are analogous to telephone switches and thus are tempting targets for skilled hackers who are interested in disrupting, or even rerouting, communications traffic on the network.

In the category of attacks known collectively as "denial of service," the objective is to disable the target system without necessarily gaining access to it. One technically straightforward method of accomplishing this objective is "mailbombing," the practice of sending large volumes of e-mail to a single site (or user account) to clog the mail server or even to cause the target host to crash. Other methods – ranging from simply tying up incoming phone lines to more sophisticated attacks using low-level data transmission protocols – may also be used to achieve the same end: rendering the target system unavailable for normal use. These sorts of denial-of-service attacks recently received much publicity when several major websites, including Yahoo.com, Amazon.com, eBay.com, and Buy.com, were temporarily disabled as a result of such attacks.

2. Computers as Storage Devices

A second way in which computers can be used to further unlawful activity involves the use of a computer or a computer device as a passive storage medium. As noted above, drug dealers might use computers to store information regarding their sales and customers. Another example is a hacker who uses a computer to store stolen password lists, credit card or calling card numbers, proprietary corporate information, pornographic image files, or "warez" (pirated commercial software). As discussed in Part III below, computers often can provide valuable evidence that may help law enforcement respond to unlawful conduct.

Indeed, computers have made it possible for law enforcement agencies to gather some information that may not have been previously even maintained in the physical world. For example, an unsophisticated offender, even after "deleting" computer files (as opposed to destroying paper records), might leave evidence of unlawful activity that a trained computer forensic expert could recover. In addition, because an average computer with several gigabytes of memory can contain millions of pages of information, a law enforcement agent might, pursuant to lawful authority (such as a warrant), find volumes of information in one place. Of course, that information is only useful if there are trained computer experts on hand in a timely fashion, familiar with the relevant computer hardware or software configuration, to search the computer for specific information and to retrieve it in readable form (see generally Part III.B below).

3. Computers as Communications Tools

Another way that a computer can be used in a cybercrime is as a communications tool. Many of the crimes falling within this category are simply traditional crimes that are committed online. Indeed, many of the examples in this report deal with unlawful conduct that exists in the physical, "offline" world – the illegal sale of prescription drugs, controlled substances, alcohol, and guns; fraud; gambling; and child pornography. These examples are, of course, only illustrative; online facilities may be used in the furtherance of a broad range of traditional unlawful activity. E-mail and chat sessions, for example, can be used to plan or coordinate almost any type of unlawful act, or even to communicate threats or extortion demands to victims (see cyberstalking box).


Just as legitimate use of the Internet is growing, so too is the Internet increasingly being used to facilitate traditional offenses. For example, because e-mail allows private communications between parties, individuals have used the Internet to send threatening e-mails (including threats to the President). The Internet's one-to-many broadcast capability has also allowed individuals to falsely advertise goods on the Internet or on a website.


The Internet's file transfer capability also enables the Internet to be used as a product delivery system. Because large files can be copied and transmitted reliably, quickly, and cheaply, software companies are now selling software over the Internet: the buyer simply provides a credit card number and downloads the software from the Internet to his or her personal computer. This same capability unfortunately allows for the unauthorized reproduction and distribution of copyrighted software.

Some criminal activities employ both the product delivery and communications features of the Internet. For example, pedophiles may use the Internet's file transfer utilities to distribute and receive child pornography, and use its communications features to make contact with children. Because users need not transmit their voice or appearance, it is easy for an adult to pose as a child and to gain the confidence of children online.

As noted above, this report’s primary focus is on this third way in which computers can be used to commit unlawful acts – the use of computers and modern telecommunications facilities as tools (analogous to the use of telephones as tools) to commit an offense. Many of the enforcement and investigative challenges associated with unlawful conduct on the Internet, however, extend to all three ways in which computers can be used for unlawful activity. Consequently, the recommendations contained in this report, if acted upon, could assist law enforcement agencies in combating all types of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet.

B. A Framework for Evaluating Unlawful Conduct on the Internet

In its assessment of the extent to which existing federal laws are sufficient to address unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet, the Working Group developed four general principles to guide its analysis. These principles form the basis for the analytical framework proposed by the Working Group for evaluating the need, if any, for Internet-specific regulation of the particular conduct at issue. The principles flow from the Administration’s overall pursuit of policies that recognize and support the enormous potential economic and social benefits of the medium, without unintentionally stifling its growth.

1. Online-Offline Consistency

First, substantive regulation of unlawful conduct (e.g., legislation providing for civil or criminal penalties for given conduct) should, as a rule, apply in the same way to conduct in the cyberworld as it does to conduct in the physical world. If an activity is prohibited in the physical world but not on the Internet, then the Internet becomes a safe haven for that unlawful activity. Similarly, conduct that is not prohibited in the physical world should not be subject to prohibition merely because it is carried out in cyberspace.

Thus, the first step in any analysis of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet is to examine how the law treats the same conduct in the offline world. That is, unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet should not be treated as a special form of conduct outside the scope of existing laws. For example, fraud that is perpetrated through the use of the Internet should not be treated any differently, as a matter of substantive criminal law, from fraud that is perpetrated through the use of the telephone or the mail. To the extent existing laws treat online and offline conduct inconsistently, they should be amended to remove inconsistencies.7 As the discussion below and the detailed analyses of several examples in the appendices to this report illustrate, however, existing substantive law is generally sufficient to cover unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet.

2. Appropriate Investigatory Tools

Second, to enforce substantive laws that apply to online conduct, law enforcement authorities need appropriate tools for detecting and investigating unlawful conduct involving the Internet. For example, as discussed in greater detail below, to the extent existing investigative authority is tied to a particular technology, it may need to be modified or clarified so that it also applies to the Internet.

Indeed, new technologies may justify new forms of investigative authority. Before the invention of the telephone, for example, law enforcement had no need for wiretaps, but once it was clear that the telephone was being used to facilitate illegal activity, that new authority – circumscribed with protections for civil liberties and other societal interests – became necessary and appropriate. Similarly, features of the Internet that make it different from prior technologies may justify the need for changes in laws and procedures that govern the detection and investigation of computer crimes. These features, highlighted here in summary form, are discussed in greater detail below:

• The global and boundaryless nature of the Internet means that different law enforcement agencies in different jurisdictions will have to cooperate and coordinate their activities in ways that they have probably never before done.

• Anonymity on the Internet can provide social benefits, but misrepresentation of identity can also facilitate fraud and deception. Misrepresentation of identity can also result in access by children to inappropriate material and can create law enforcement investigatory challenges, especially if perpetrated by sophisticated computer users, for it can make criminal activity on the Internet more difficult to detect and prove.

• The potential to reach vast audiences easily means that the scale of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet is often much wider than the same conduct in the offline world. To borrow a military analogy, use of the Internet can be a "force multiplier."

• The routine storage of information that can be linked to an individual can often provide more information to law enforcement (where an individual has been identified or a computer lawfully seized) than may be available in the offline world, but only if the electronic information is handled properly by a trained investigator and if the information obtained is ultimately available in useable form.

Thus, apart from ensuring that online and offline behavior is treated consistently as a matter of substantive law, legislators and policymakers should examine whether law enforcement agencies have appropriate tools to detect and investigate unlawful conduct involving the Internet. That is, even if Internet-specific laws are unnecessary to ensure that criminal and civil penalties apply to the use of the Internet to facilitate unlawful conduct, it may be necessary to alter or augment law enforcement’s tools and authorities to meet the new investigatory challenges that such unlawful conduct presents.

3. Technology-Neutrality

Third, to the extent specific regulation of online activity may be necessary (in view of the consistency principle noted above), any such regulation should be drafted in a technology-neutral way. Regulation tied to a particular technology may quickly become obsolete and require further amendment. In particular, laws written before the widespread use of the Internet may be based on assumptions regarding then-current technologies and thus may need to be clarified or updated to reflect new technological capabilities or realities. For example, regulation of "wire communications" may not account for the fact that communications may now occur through wireless means or by satellite. Technology-specific laws and regulations may also "lock-in" a particular technology, hindering the development of superior technology.

4. Consideration of Other Societal Interests

Fourth, any government regulation of conduct involving the use of the Internet requires a careful consideration of different societal interests. In addition to society’s strong interests in investigating and prosecuting unlawful conduct, society also has strong interests in promoting free speech, protecting children, protecting reasonable expectations of privacy, providing broad access to public information, and supporting legitimate commerce.

As applied to the Internet, consideration of other societal interests can present difficult issues, in part because the Internet is different in important ways from existing, "traditional" modes of communication. For example, the Internet is a multi-faceted communications medium that allows not only point-to-point transmission between two parties (like the telephone), but also the widespread dissemination of information to a vast audience (like a newspaper). Internet-specific laws and policies that operate by analogy to those designed for telephone communications or the press may not fit the new medium. The Internet also presents new issues relating to online expectations of privacy and confidentiality that may or may not have analogs in the offline world. Accordingly, rules and regulations designed to protect the safety and security of Internet users should be carefully tailored to accomplish their objectives without unintended consequences, such as stifling the growth of the Internet or chilling its use as a free and open communication medium.

Another aspect of the need to consider different societal interests is to appreciate the need for an appropriate balance among the roles of the government (whether federal, state, local, or other) and the role of the private sector in formulating solutions to Internet policy issues. For example, because regulation of the practices of medicine and pharmacy has traditionally been the province of the states, regulation of online pharmacies presents difficult federal-state jurisdictional and coordination issues (see Appendix D). And, as discussed in the next section, given the Administration’s support for private-sector leadership and market-based self-regulation regarding e-commerce, there must be ongoing and regular dialogue with interested parties and groups to ensure that government policies do not have unintended consequences.

C. Promoting Private Sector Leadership

Consistent with the Administration’s overall e-commerce policy, the private sector has a critical role to play in ensuring a safe and secure online environment. The distributed, networked, and decentralized nature of the Internet now means that the "rules of the road" must be global, flexible, effective, and readily adaptable to technological change. In particular, the private sector must take the lead in areas such as the design of new technologies to protect children online, self-regulatory consumer protection initiatives, and coordination and cooperation with law enforcement authorities.

In response to the marketplace, for example, there are now many technological options for shielding children from inappropriate content. As discussed in more detail in Part IV.A below, these technological developments include filtering and blocking software, outgoing information blocks, filtered Internet browsers and search engines, filtered Internet service providers, time blocking mechanisms and monitoring tools. Similarly, child-friendly websites are now widespread on the Internet. These websites allow parents to limit a child’s access to sites beyond the web service designated for the child’s use. In July 1999, the private sector launched the "GetNet Wise" initiative, a new easy-to-access online resource for parents to help keep their children safe online. "GetNet Wise" is a resource containing information on Internet safety tips, consumer content filtering products, law enforcement contacts, and a guide to quality educational and age appropriate online content. Although none of these tools can guarantee that a child will be shielded at all times from inappropriate material on the Internet, their use gives parents the ability to restrict a child’s use to the resources on the Internet that they may deem appropriate.

In addition, in response to challenges issued by Commerce Secretary Daley, industry has worked with consumer representatives to develop consumer protection practices, codes of conduct for business-to-consumer e-commerce, and alternative, easy-to-use mechanisms for consumer resolution, redress, and enforcement.

• For example, the Better Business Bureau’s online division, BBBOnLine, is working with industry, consumer, and government representatives to develop a voluntary code to provide online merchants with guidelines to implement consumer protections. The code includes guidance on key consumer protections such as disclosure of sale terms, data privacy, dispute resolution mechanisms, and non-deceptive advertising.

• Another group, the Electronic Commerce and Consumer Protection Group, whose members include America Online, American Express, AT&T, Dell, IBM, Microsoft, Time Warner, Inc., and Visa, is working with consumer leaders to develop an innovative approach to jurisdiction as it applies to consumer protection in a global electronic marketplace. This group is also developing a voluntary code of conduct. The goal of the group is to formulate concrete approaches to protect consumers and facilitate e-commerce.

These creative efforts are important to developing effective consumer protection in e- commerce, because as e-commerce expands to encompass more international business-to-consumer transactions, the traditional means of protecting consumers solely through national laws will become more difficult.

In addition to specific consumer protection initiatives, the private sector’s dedication and support for a secure Internet system is crucial to curbing unlawful conduct on the Internet. Not only must industry continue to develop security policies and safeguards for their networks and systems, but it should also continue its efforts to identify security flaws that threaten the Internet. For example, computer experts from industry and the Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center of Carnegie-Mellon University recently warned of a new Internet security threat that wrongdoers could potentially use to place malicious programs on a victim’s computer and to gather information that a person volunteers on websites, such as credit card and Social Security numbers.8 The Partnership for Critical Infrastructure Protection will provide a cross-sectoral forum for the private sector to address a variety of infrastructure assurance issues, including information sharing, development of best practices, promotion of needed R&D, and workforce development. Another example of private sector cooperation in this effort is InfraGard, which is an information sharing and analysis partnership among the FBI, private sector companies, academic institutions, and other federal, state, and local agencies. InfraGard serves to increase the security of the national infrastructure through ongoing exchanges of infrastructure-protection information and through education, outreach, and other awareness efforts.

The private sector also has a key role to play in continuing to coordinate and cooperate with law enforcement authorities as appropriate. Industry trade groups, such as the Internet Alliance and the Information Technology Association of America ("ITAA"), have been working to develop public-private cooperative efforts that will mutually benefit law enforcement, industry, and consumers. The Internet Alliance’s Law Enforcement and Security Council has been developing parental control software and educational campaigns, opening channels of communication between industry and law enforcement representatives, and creating training programs for law enforcement and industry on issues of mutual interest. ITAA, through its Cybercitzen Project (see Part IV.C below), is working with the Department of Justice to develop education campaigns, personnel exchange programs, and a directory of industry contacts.

Although the private sector has taken important steps in the areas of prevention and online security, there is still much that industry can do to ensure that the Internet is a safe and secure environment. For example:

• Industry should continue to develop and embrace initiatives to protect consumers and children online. These may include technological tools (e.g., more sophisticated blocking, filtering, and parental control software) as well as non-technological tools (e.g., educational campaigns). In particular, industry should continue to be involved in education programs that teach younger Internet users about online responsibilities and online citizenship.

• Industry should continue to cooperate with law enforcement agencies as appropriate. This does not mean that industry ought to be a "co-regulator" with government or that industry needs to be an online police officer. But it does mean that industry should be a voluntary, responsible partner in society’s fight against crime, educating its employees on how to recognize unlawful conduct on the Internet and what to do if they discover such conduct. It means working with law enforcement agencies to develop reliable and efficient procedures and channels of communication and cooperation for processing law enforcement requests and investigative information. As the "Melissa" virus case demonstrates, industry’s involvement and reporting of information is often crucial to the investigation and prosecution of online offenders.

• Industry should carefully balance reasonable expectations of customer privacy with the need to ensure a safe and secure online environment. For example, some industry members may not retain certain system data long enough to permit law enforcement to identify online offenders. This does not mean that data retention policies need to be uniform or mandatory. To the contrary, in evaluating the costs and benefits of data retention – which include a wide variety of considerations, including market needs, protection of consumer privacy, and public safety – industry should simply give appropriate weight to the wider value to itself and to society of retaining certain information that, among other things, may be essential to apprehending a lawbreaker.

• Industry should be encouraged to recognize that meaningful self-regulation is in its interest as well as in the interests of its customers. Information technology security programs (that teach employees about computer ethics, responsible online practices, and security policies), for instance, help protect computer systems from intruders as well as online offenders. Indeed, as we noted at the outset of this report (see Part I.C above), law enforcement and industry share a common mission in reducing unlawful online conduct, for a safe and secure online environment is essential to consumer confidence, which is in turn essential to ensuring that the Internet continues to grow as a medium for communications and commerce.

The Working Group looks forward to continuing to work with the private sector and other interested parties and groups in partnership on these important issues.

D. Sufficiency of Existing Federal Laws

Private sector leadership is, of course, necessary but not sufficient to address unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet. Substantive criminal laws represent a societal determination, expressed through our democratic institutions of government, that certain conduct is so harmful or morally unacceptable that reliance on self-regulation or the market to regulate the conduct is inappropriate. There is thus a need to evaluate whether existing substantive laws apply to unlawful conduct that is committed through the use of the Internet.

Toward that end, and in the context of the framework of policy principles discussed above, the Working Group analyzed several examples of unlawful conduct involving the use of the Internet. The examples, as discussed in detail in appendices to this report, include not only those specifically mentioned in Executive Order 13,133, but also those taken from our experience with legislative proposals and from Executive branch agencies that have jurisdiction to respond to these forms of unlawful conduct.

1. Analysis of Substantive Laws

The Working Group’s analysis reveals that existing substantive federal laws appear to be generally adequate to protect users from unlawful conduct on the Internet. As listed and summarized in Table 1 below, such laws generally do not distinguish between unlawful conduct committed through the use of the Internet and the same conduct committed through the use of other, more traditional means of communication.

For example, laws governing fraud – such as credit card fraud, identity theft, securities fraud, and unfair and deceptive trade acts or practices – apply with equal force to both online as well as offline conduct (see Appendix B). Laws prohibiting the distribution and possession of child pornography and the luring of minors across state lines for unlawful sexual activity have been used with success to prosecute and convict those who use the Internet to distribute such material or to communicate with child victims in violation of statutory prohibitions (see Appendix C). And laws that prohibit the dispensing of prescription drugs without a valid prescription from a licensed medical professional can be applied to online pharmacies that dispense prescription drugs without required regulatory safeguards (see Appendix D).

Laws in other areas – the sale of firearms (Appendix E); interstate transmission of gambling information (Appendix F); sale of alcohol (Appendix G); securities fraud (Appendix H); and theft of intellectual property (Appendix I) – also generally apply to online conduct as well as offline conduct. Although existing federal laws generally prohibit Internet gambling, technological advances make it prudent to update existing federal laws to ensure that they are technology-neutral and prohibit gambling activities that did not exist before the advent of the Internet (see Appendix F). And, in the area of intellectual property protection, current Sentencing Guidelines pertaining to intellectual property crimes should be updated to ensure that law enforcement agencies and prosecutors commit the resources to continue to pursue these cases vigorously (see Appendix I).

Table 1 – Summary of Analysis of Existing FederalLaw

Types of Unlawful Conduct

Examples of Potentially Applicable Federal Laws

Detailed Discussion in Appendix

Internet Fraud














15 U.S.C. §§ 45, 52 (unfair or deceptive acts or practices; false advertisements)

15 U.S.C. § 1644 (credit card fraud)

18 U.S.C. §§ 1028,1029,1030 (fraud in connection with identification documents and information; fraud in connection with access devices; and fraud in connection with computers)

18 U.S.C. § 1341 et seq. (mail, wire, and bank fraud)

18 U.S.C. § 1345 (injunctions against fraud)
18 U.S.C. § 1956, 1957 (money laundering)

B















Online Child Pornography, Child Luring, and Related Activities

18 U.S.C. § 2251 et seq. (sexual exploitation and other abuse of children)
18 U.S.C. § 2421 et seq. (transportation for illegal sexual activity)

C

Internet Sale of Prescription Drugs and Controlled Substances







15 U.S.C. § 45 et seq. (unfair or deceptive acts or practices; false advertisemen 

Derniers articles

Verdun 2016 : La légende de la « tranchée des baïonnettes »
Eyes in the Dark: Navy Dive Helmet Display Emerges as Game-Changer
OIR Official: Captured Info Describes ISIL Operations in Manbij
Cyber, Space, Middle East Join Nuclear Triad Topics at Deterrence Meeting
Carter Opens Second DoD Innovation Hub in Boston
Triomphe de St-Cyr : le Vietnam sur les rangs
Dwight D. Eisenhower Conducts First OIR Missions from Arabian Gulf
L’amiral Prazuck prend la manœuvre de la Marine
Airmen Practice Rescuing Downed Pilots in Pacific Thunder 16-2
On ne lutte pas contre les moustiques avec une Kalachnikov...
Enemy Mine: Underwater Drones Hunt Buried Targets, Save Lives
Daesh Publications Are Translated Into Eleven Languages
Opération Chammal : 10 000 heures de vol en opération pour les Mirage 2000 basés en Jordanie
Le Drian : Daech : une réponse à plusieurs niveaux
Carter: Defense Ministers Agree on Next Steps in Counter-ISIL Fight
Carter Convenes Counter-ISIL Coalition Meeting at Andrews
Carter Welcomes France’s Increased Counter-ISIL Support
100-Plus Aircraft Fly in for Exercise Red Flag 16-3
Growlers Soar With B-1s Around Ellsworth AFB
A-10s Deploy to Slovakia for Cross-Border Training
We Don’t Fight Against Mosquitoes With a Kalashnikov
Bug-Hunting Computers to Compete in DARPA Cyber Grand Challenge
Chiefs of US and Chinese Navies Agree on Need for Cooperation
DoD Cyber Strategy Defines How Officials Discern Cyber Incidents from Armed Attacks
Vice Adm. Tighe Takes Charge of Information Warfare, Naval Intelligence
Truman Strike Group Completes Eight-Month Deployment
KC-46 Completes Milestone by Refueling Fighter Jet, Cargo Plane
Air Dominance and the Critical Role of Fifth Generation Fighters
Une nation est une âme
The Challenges of Ungoverned Spaces
Carter Salutes Iraqi Forces, Announces 560 U.S. Troops to Deploy to Iraq
Obama: U.S. Commitment to European Security is Unwavering in Pivotal Time for NATO
International Court to Decide Sovereignty Issue in South China Sea
La SPA 75 est centenaire !
U.S. to Deploy THAAD Missile Battery to South Korea
Maintien en condition des matériels : reprendre l’initiative
La veste « léopard », premier uniforme militaire de camouflage
Océan Indien 2016 : Opérations & Coopération
Truman Transits Strait of Gibraltar
Navy Unveils National Museum of the American Sailor
New Navy, Old Tar
Marcel Dassault parrain de la nouvelle promotion d’officiers de l’École de l’Air
RIMPAC 2016 : Ravitaillement à la mer pour le Prairial avant l’arrivée à Hawaii
Bataille de la Somme, l’oubliée
U.S., Iceland Sign Security Cooperation Agreement
Cléopatra : la frégate Jean Bart entre dans l’histoire du BPC Gamal Abdel Nasser
Surveiller l’espace maritime français aussi par satellite
America's Navy-Marine Corps Team Fuse for RIMPAC 2016
Stratégie France : Plaidoyer pour une véritable coopération franco-allemande
La lumière du Droit rayonne au bout du chemin





Directeur de la publication : Joël-François Dumont
Comité de rédaction : Jacques de Lestapis, Hugues Dumont, François de Vries (Bruxelles), Hans-Ulrich Helfer (Suisse), Michael Hellerforth (Allemagne).
Comité militaire : VAE Guy Labouérie (†), GAA François Mermet (2S), CF Patrice Théry (Asie).

Contact