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CNO Releases Annual Navigation Plan

CNO Releases Annual Navigation Plan

From Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs.
Washington D.C. – (NNS) – August 20, 2014 – The Navy's top leader released a detailed plan Tuesday that highlights the U.S. Navy's intended track and investments for the next five fiscal years.

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert speaks to Naval Air Station Fallon Sailors, civilians and family members during an all-hands call. Fallon was Greenert's first stop on a four-day fleet engagement tour of Navy bases, stations and ships from Fallon, Ventura County and the acific Northwest to San Diego.

U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Peter D. Lawlor

"This navigation plan defines the course and speed we will follow to organize, train and equip our Navy over the next several years," said Greenert in the document. "Despite likely sequestration in 2016, our priority is to operate forward where it matters, when it matters, and be ready to address a wide range of threats and contingencies."

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert's 2015-2019 Navigation Plan defines how the Navy will use its resources to safely and effectively pursue the vision detailed in Sailing Directions.

"Crafting this year's budget included tough choices across a wide range of competing priorities - we focused first on building appropriate capability, then delivering it at a capacity we could afford," said Greenert.

Each year since Greenert released the Sailing Directions the Navigation Plan has described the annual Navy's budget submission for the future years. The Navigation Plan has highlighted investments in support of DOD's guidance and strategic documents as well as this year's 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review.

In the plan Greenert explains how the Navy will acclimate to budget challenges, increasing operational tempo while balancing current readiness with the need to build a highly capable future fleet. Pursuing the vision set in the Sailing Directions this plan lays out the investments that will allow the Navy to maintain it's warfighting edge, forward presence and keep Navy members prepared, confident and proficient. This plan highlights how investments will support Navy missions through the lens of the three tenets, Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be ready.

Greenert emphasizes in the document that everything sailors and civilians do must be grounded in the responsibility of warfighting first. He says the Navy must be able to achieve access in any domain and possess the capability mix of kinetic and non-kinetic weapons to prevail today and be ready to win tomorrow. He provided a list of capabilities that center on this objective and followed with a comparable list of items that support operate forward and be ready.
Additionally, the Navigation Plan summarizes the six programmatic priorities that guided the Navy's budget planning for the future of the fleet: maintaining sea based strategic deterrent, sustaining a global forward presence, preserve the means for victory against aggressors, focus on readiness afloat and ashore, enhance asymmetric capabilities in physical domains as well as in cyberspace and electromagnetic spectrum and sustain a relevant industrial base.

This navigation plan was released by Greenert to Navy's senior leaders and distributed on Navy's social media properties as a priority to be communicated at all levels.
Greenert will release a Position Report later in the year that reviews the Navy's progress over the last year in pursuing objectives laid out in the Sailing Directions and earlier Navigation Plans, which can be found on his leadership page.

To view the CNO's Navigation Plan, click here : CNO’s Navigation Plan 2015 - 2019

For more news from Chief of Naval Operations, visit www.navy.mil/local/cno/.

CNO’s Navigation Plan 2015 - 2019

Fiscal Year (FY) 2015-2019 pursues the vision of CNO’s Sailing Directions. It highlights investments in support of DoD missions outlined in our defense strategic guidance (DSG), Sustaining U.S. Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense, and 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), viewed through the lens of my three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. This Navigation Plan defines the course and speed we will follow to organize, train, and equip our Navy over the next several years.

A Navigation Plan draws from Sailing Directions to describe in greater detail how a ship will use its resources to safely and effectively sail to a new destination. Similarly, CNO’s Navigation Plan describes how Navy’s budget submission for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015-2019 pursues the vision of CNO’s Sailing Directions. It highlights investments in support of DoD missions outlined in our defense strategic guidance (DSG), Sustaining U.S. Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense, and 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), viewed through the lens of my three tenets: Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready. This Navigation Plan defines the course and speed we will follow to organize, train, and equip our Navy over the next several years.

This fiscal climate compelled the Navy to make tough choices across a wide range of competing priorities. We focused first on building appropriate capability, then delivering it at a capacity we could afford. Our Navy will do its part to “put our fiscal house in order,” but we will do so in a
responsible way, balancing current readiness with the need to build a highly capable future fleet. Despite likely sequestration in FY 2016, our priority is to operate forward where it matters, when it matters, and be ready to address a wide range of threats and contingencies.

Six programmatic priorities guided our budget submission as we planned for the future: (1) maintain a credible, modern, and survivable sea- based strategic deterrent, (2) sustain forward presence, distributed globally in places that count, (3) preserve the means to win decisively in one multi- phase contingency operation and deny the objectives of another aggressor in a second region, (4) focus on critical afloat and ashore readiness to ensure our Navy is adequately funded and ready, (5) enhance the Navy’s asymmetric capabilities in the physical domains as well as in cyberspace and the electromagnetic spectrum, and (6) sustain a relevant industrial base, particularly in shipbuilding. I will take a “fix” on where we stand with these priorities later this year in a “Position Report.”

Warfighting first

Everything we do must be grounded in this responsibility. Our Navy must be able to achieve access in any domain—where we need it, when we need it—and possess the capability mix of kinetic and non-kinetic weapons to prevail today and be ready to win tomorrow. To maintain our warfighting edge, our FY 2015-2019 budget submission will:
◆ Sustain a credible, survivable, and modern sea-based strategic deterrent, including today’s force of 14 OHIO-class SSBNs, the Trident D5 ballistic missile and support systems, and associated Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications. Our budget also begins advance procurement of the next-generation sea-based strategic deterrent, the OHIO Replacement Program, which will begin construction in 2021 and deliver in 2028. The Ohio Replacement will make its first patrol in 2031.
◆ Sustain our advantage in the undersea domain. In 2015, the twelfth VIRGINIA-class attack submarine will enter the Fleet, with eight more planned for delivery through 2019. We will also recapitalize our Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force with an additional 13 P-8A POSEIDONs delivering in FY 2015 alone, building to approximately 80 by the end of 2019.
◆ Deliver the lead ships of two new classes of warships. USS ZUMWALT, the first of three multi-mission advanced destroyers, will deliver in 2015. USS GERALD R. FORD, our new aircraft carrier class, will deliver in early 2016, sustaining our power projection capabilities into the 2060s.
◆ Continue to improve the passive and active kill-chain capabilities of netted, multi-mission carrier air wing aircraft from NIMITZ and FORD Class aircraft carriers to assure sea control and strike dominance in contested sea and air spaces. We will start integrating the F-35C into the air wing by the end of the decade. Additionally, we will improve our platforms’ reach in all domains through new payloads of more capable sensors, networks, and weapons.
◆ Continue to expand the role of small surface combatants and reconfigurable support ships, which will provide a high-low mix of capabilities that can be employed across the full spectrum of conflict. These ships will relieve pressure on the global demand for large surface combatants and amphibious ships, and allow commanders to deploy adaptive force packages suitable to changing mission needs. The following ships deliver in 2015:
○ Four new Littoral Combat Ships (LCS 5-8);
○ Two Joint High-Speed Vessels (JHSV 5-6);
○ The first of three Mobile Landing Platform Afloat Forward Staging Bases (MLP/AFSB).
◆ Induct a number of guided missile cruisers and dock landing ships into a phased modernization period to modernize and extend their service lives into the 2030s. This is not our first choice—CG global presence is an enduring need—but budget limits compel us to take this course.
◆ Enhance our ability to maneuver freely in the electromagnetic spectrum by equipping our ships with more capability to intercept signals and conduct information warfare, and by adding jamming and deception capabilities to counter advanced anti-ship missiles. The budget request also supports the Next Generation Jammer, providing the EA-18G GROWLER with enhanced Airborne Electronic Attack capabilities starting in 2021.
◆ Strengthen our cyber posture by developing systems to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threats and safeguard classified national security information. We will also align Navy networks with a more defensible DOD Joint Information Environment through installations
of Consolidated Afloat Networks and Enterprise Services (CANES) on combatants and at Maritime Operation Centers; implement the Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) ashore; and consolidate data centers. In addition, we are establishing a single Navy “CYBERSAFE” authority to manage cyber security of Navy-wide networks, platforms, and systems “cradle to grave.” We continue to expand exploitation capabilities and offensive payloads. We are also proceeding to recruit, train, and hire almost 1,000 cyber operators, and are on track to form 40 cyber mission teams by the end of 2016.

Operate forward       mi

America’s Navy is at its best when operating forward. Our overseas presence gives the President options, and bolsters global stability through frequent engagement with allies and partners, building trust and confidence. Our FY 2015-2019 budget submission supports our posture by:
◆ Providing a forward presence of about 120 ships by 2020, up from an average of 97 in 2014.
◆ Continuing the Asia-Pacific rebalance, increasing presence from approximately 50 ships in 2014 to about 65 in 2019. Our most capable platforms will operate in the Western Pacific, including the newest DDGs, JHSV, both LCS variants, P-8A, EA-18G, upgraded F/A-18E/F, E-2D, and F-35C. An additional attack submarine will join three others in Guam in 2015 and MQ-4C TRITON high endurance unmanned aerial vehicles will start operating from Guam by 2018.
◆ Increasing presence in the Middle East from around 30 ships today to around 40 in 2019. Ten of our Patrol Craft serve as Forward Deployed Naval Forces operating out of Bahrain this year and four LCS will join them by the end of 2019. USNS LEWIS B. PULLER, the first MLP/ AFSB, will relieve USS PONCE in 2016 to support Special Operations Forces, and provide Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance, and mine countermeasure capability.
◆ Evolving our posture in Europe by meeting European Phased Adaptive Approach requirements with AEGIS Ashore sites in Romania and Poland to protect against potential Iranian missile threats. Also, by the end of 2015 a total of four DDGs will be forward stationed in Rota, Spain to augment Naval Forces Europe’s Ballistic Missile Defense capability.
◆ Providing innovative, low-cost and small footprint presence in Africa and South America. Beginning in 2015, we will deploy on average one hospital ship (T-AH) each year, and in 2016, on average one patrol coastal (PC) ship to South America each year. JHSV, AFSB, and other ships and aircraft will provide periodic presence in these regions as mission needs dictate.
◆ Continuing to deploy Naval Expeditionary Forces such as Seabees and Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams to engage in security force assistance and other projects that strengthen our alliances and partnerships.

Be ready

Ready Sailors, Civilians, and Families remain the foundation of the Navy’s warfighting capability. Our people must be prepared, confident, and proficient. The high global demand for Navy forces stresses the force; therefore this budget continues to provide services and support to ensure that our people remain resilient and ready. Our program:
◆ Employs a revised framework starting in 2015 called the Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) that will better prepare our units and crews, while making deployments more predictable and increasing operational availability in at-sea billets.
◆ Prioritizes and rewards service at sea through increased sea pay and critical skills incentive pays.
◆ Invests in Quality of Service initiatives such as barracks and training building improvements, greater travel and schools, expanded use of tactical trainers and simulators, and increased funding for spare parts and tools. It also leverages smart technology devices and applications through an “eSailor” initiative to enhance training, communication and Sailor career management ashore and afloat.
◆ Ensures robust support for vital programs aimed at the safety, health, and well-being of our Sailors. Our 21st Century Sailor Office will continue to tackle challenges like sexual assault through prevention, response and world-class victim advocacy programs.
◆ Expands development and fielding of live, virtual, and constructive training environments to provide more realistic training at a reduced cost.
◆ Focuses facility maintenance and repairs on infrastructure that supports Fleet operations, with highest priority given to critical operational facilities such as piers and runways.
◆ Continues to evolve Information Dominance as a mainstream warfighting discipline by establishing a dedicated Type Commander
– the Navy Information Dominance Forces Command – responsible for the readiness of intelligence, oceanography and meteorology, information warfare, networks, and space capabilities.

CNO’s Navigation Plan 2015 - 2019


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Directeur de la publication : Joël-François Dumont
Comité de rédaction : Jacques de Lestapis, Hugues Dumont, François de Vries (Bruxelles), Hans-Ulrich Helfer (Suisse), Michael Hellerforth (Allemagne).
Comité militaire : VAE Guy Labouérie (†), GAA François Mermet (2S), CF Patrice Théry (Asie).

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